Opinion Polls and Surveys Showing Support for the Abolition of State Governments or Similar Reforms


Between Wednesday 14 May and Friday 16 May 2014, Galaxy Research carried out an online survey and study, commissioned by Beyond Federation, of a sample of 1050 Australian adults, using the question and response options as follows below: 
It has been estimated that the abolition of State governments could benefit Australia to the tune of at least $40 billion per annum. If a referendum were held on the question of whether State governments should be abolished, would you support the abolition of State governments?
Response options:
Yes
No
Don’t know
The State Government Study, Galaxy's detailed report of the results of this online survey, shows (see page 5, on the 'Main Findings' page) that:
Opinion is divided on whether the State governments should be abolished. While 39% of the population think they should be, 31% are opposed and 30% undecided.
So excluding the 30% undecided response, 56% of the population think State governments should be abolished, and 44% are opposed to the abolition of State governments.
These 39% and 56% support figure are the Australia-wide figures for all people surveyed.  Among females, the Australia-wide support figures are just 32% and 49%, and for males they are 46% and 63% (see page 13 of the State Government Study report).  Sub-national support rates (see page 14 of the State Government Study report) are:
New South Wales (including the ACT)  41% yes, 29% no, 29% don't know, so excluding "don't know" responses: 59% Yes, 41% no
Victoria and Tasmania (combined)       39% yes, 31% no, 30% don't know, so excluding "don't know" responses: 56% Yes, 44% no
Queensland                                              43% yes, 29% no, 28% don't know, so excluding "don't know" responses: 60% Yes, 40% no
South Australia                                         31% yes, 34% no, 35% don't know, so excluding "don't know" responses: 48% Yes, 52% no
Western Australia                                     30% yes, 38% no, 32% don't know, so excluding "don't know" responses: 45% Yes, 55% no


On the weekend of 1-3 February 2013, Galaxy Research carried out a telephone survey and study, commissioned by Beyond Federation, of a sample of 1052 Australians, using the question and response options as follows below:
Thinking now about state and federal laws. Currently there are different laws in the eight states and territories of Australia. Would you be in favour or opposed to having just one set of laws for the whole country?
Response options:
In favour
Opposed
Neither/ Don’t know
The Australian Laws Study, Galaxy's detailed report of the results of this telephone survey, shows (see page 5, on the 'Main Findings' page) that:
The majority of Australians are in favour of having a unified set of laws for all states and territories.
Overall, 78% are in favour of having one set of laws, 19% are opposed and 3% are uncommitted.
This 78% support figure is the Australia-wide figure for all people surveyed.  Among females, the Australia-wide support figure is 80%, and for males it is 76% (see page 13 of the Australian Laws Study report).  Sub-national support rates (see page 14 of the Australian Laws Study report) are:
New South Wales (including the ACT)  83% in favour, 14% opposed, 3% neither / don't know
Victoria and Tasmania (combined)       77% in favour, 20% opposed, 3% neither / don't know
Queensland                                              80% in favour, 17% opposed, 2% neither / don't know
South Australia                                        74% in favour, 23% opposed, 3% neither / don't know
Western Australia                                    63% in favour, 35% opposed, 2% neither / don't know

The Courier Mail carried out an online poll from on the question "Should state governments be abolished?", with its 28 September 2012 article Former Treasury deputy secretary Richard Murray's paper proposes abolishing state governments, with the results as at 11 October 2012 as follows, where this same online poll was accessible via the websites of the Australian, Telegraph, Herald Sun, Adelaide Now and Perth Now newspapers as well as the Courier Mail:
Yes 76.12% (3796 votes)
No 19.21% (958 votes)
Undecided 4.67% (233 votes)
Total votes: 4987

A participant on the Railpage Australia website recorded votes as they stood on 28 September 2012 for the Courier Mail poll as above on a page titled Two tiered Australian govts, as follows:
Should state governments be abolished?
Yes 76.16% (2719 votes)
No 19.02% (679 votes)
Undecided 4.82% (172 votes)
Total votes: 3570

Most Favor End of State Parliaments, Australia Speaks No. 47, 9 June 1942

ABC Unleashed - IQ2 debate
2020 Unleashed - Get rid of the states, 16 April 2008
Abolish State Governments, 28 May 2009
See especially:
A thought-provoking and entertaining debate, with some interesting outcomes. The pre-debate poll was 67 per cent for the motion, 18 per cent against and 15 per cent undecided. After the hearty arguments from both sides the results were announced: 54 per cent for, 33 per cent against and 13 per cent undecided.

A Sydney Morning Herald poll carried out in conjunction with the IQ2 debate as above generated the following responses to the question "Should state government be abolished?":
Yes - 81%
No - 15%
Not sure - 4%
Total Votes: 2698  Poll date: 26/05/09

Study reveals Australians waiting for more federal reform, Griffith University media alert, 2 July 2008
Griffith University ‘Constitutional Values’ Survey, Preliminary Results – 3 July 2008
The use of the words "federal" and "federalism" in the reports on these Griffith University survey results are explained here.

The Australia Institute
Seven in 10 Australians support a Commonwealth takeover of public hospitals, and similarly with education and other functions, according to polling released by the Australia Institute on 28 July 2009

The Land newspaper carried out a poll from 9 September 2009 until 16 September 2009 which generated the following responses to the question "Do you think it's time to reform our system of government?", from a total of 495 votes:
No, there's nothing wrong with the current system.  (2.0%)
Yes - get rid of the States, and beef up local government.  (70.3%)
Yes, but not drastically. Keep the States, and redefine responsibilities.  (21.0%)
Not sure - it's not perfect now, but changing could be worse.  (6.7%)

Sydney Morning Herald Online Survey Showing that 77 per cent of Respondents Believe the Federal Government Should Run Australia's Hospital System
as published on Saturday 1 August 2009, on page 8 of the News Review section

Queensland voters want to axe state MPs, by Steven Wardill, Courier Mail, 24 June 2009
The accompanying online poll shows that as at 23 August 2009:
Responses to the question "Is Australia over-governed?" were:
Yes             94% (3910 votes)
No                 4% (195 votes)
Undecided   0% (37 votes)
Total votes: 4142 as at 23 August 2009
Responses to the question "Which tier of government should be abolished?" were:
Local         10% (189 votes)
State          85% (1577 votes)
Federal        2% (43 votes)
Undecided  1% (36 votes)
Total votes: 1845 as at 23 August 2009
Responses to the question "Should Australia hold a referendum to abolish the states?" were:
Yes              91% (1434 votes)
No                  7% (120 votes)
Undecided    0% (12 votes)
Total votes: 1566 as at 23 August 2009

A 2GB radio online survey generated the following responses to the question "How many levels of government do we need in Australia?" as at 23 August 2009:
13%  Federal & State
 67% Federal & Local
 1%   State & Local
 8%   Federal only
 11% The current system works fine

Former mayor says state govts not needed, by Peter Gardiner and Bill Hoffman, Sunshine Coast Daily, 1 September 2009
An online poll accompanying this article, ending 4 September 2009, asked "Has state govt become redundant?", and generated the following responses:
No, state government has a major role.          11%
Yes, Australia has become over-governed.     77%
Not yet, but it is fast becoming so.                 10%


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